Writer of Horror Fiction

Archive for October, 2016

Review of Tony Faville’s “Kings of the Dead”

Kings of the Dead came out six years ago, and as was quite popular at that time with zombie genre books, was written in a journal format.  The popularity of that format has died down in recent years but with my attempts to read many of the books I failed to read in years past, I am reminded once again how many authors chose to go this route.  I’ve shared the advantages and disadvantages of this format in prior reviews, and of course, this book is no exception.  I do give credit where credit is due, of course.  Author Tony Faville remains true to the format, not moving to a third person narrative at any point, which some authors tend to do when they feel the relentless need to reveal things the narrator doesn’t know and thus can’t share with the reader.    To avoid this pitfall, Cole’s journal is written in by others when he is not available at certain points in time, which fills in those gaps in the story there would otherwise be if limited to his perspective alone.  This adds a few interesting twists to the story as Cole himself reads these entries, left as notes for him upon his return to his journal.  It serves as smoother tale because the author didn’t suddenly change writing styles, which I appreciated.

The story is fairly standard zompoc fare, told from the perspective of a man with former military and medical experience, who has prepared with a group of friends for the end of the world as we know it for several years as a hobby. Zombies crop up when the vaccine for a new strain of the flu ends up reanimating those who have taken it.  The zombies are mainly the slow shamblers here, with a mix of faster undead joining the fray as the story and timeline moves forward.

This is a fairly personal story.  Like some of the other journal written sagas, there is a good chunk of the author’s personality shining through the narrator.  This is a story of someone who is a fan of the genre writing a story of survival they have envisioned for themselves and their friends.  It does add something to the telling of the tell-a pseudo autobiography envisioned by the author were there a zombie apocalypse.  Authors are guided to “write what you know” and Tony does so here, having the personal knowledge related to weaponry, medical skills, and other related topics that would have an impact on survival in an undead world.  Credit to the author for not ‘over doing it’ as I have seen a tendency of some to do when it comes to slathering their pages with an excess of demonstrated expertise in a particular area that rapidly turns into overkill.  The flow here is more natural and the while the reader will know the author knows his stuff, they won’t be blasted with it on every page.

While the survivors hunker down, attempting to build a new home in their region of Oregon for much of the first half of the book, the story becomes, in time, more of a road trip as Cole, the narrator, ponders the meaning of existence in a dead world and chooses to take a journey of discovery.  Cole struggles with the loss of friends and trying to find a reason to carry on, but there are also glimmers of hope that give him, and the reader, reasons to carry on.

There are some rough spots in the story and some of that comes from the format-we don’t get to discovery something happening as it happens, but written as a report done the following day or in the hours following the actual event, which dilutes some of the emotional resonance.  Still, there is definite emotional potency here, especially as related to the people Cole deeply cares for and will do anything to try and keep safe, which in the an undead world is a very difficult thing to do.

As is the case with many journal oriented zombie tales, there is not necessarily a main focus outside of survival written on its pages-survival of the body as well as the spirit.  As such, it meanders a good bit, but the ending was quite satisfying and unlike many of the books of a similar make and model, the author doesn’t demand that you read three or four more entries in a series to make his point.  This book does so succinctly and with quiet grace.

Overall, if as a zombie genre fan you aren’t burnt out on the diary approach to zombie fiction, Kings of the Dead is a solid addition to your library.

Kings of the Dead can be found here:  https://www.amazon.com/Kings-Dead-Tony-Faville/dp/1934861839/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

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