Writer of Horror Fiction

Posts tagged “supernatural

Review of Mark Tufo’s “Zombie Fallout”

It has taken me far too long to read the first Zombie Fallout book by Mark Tufo.  Tufo is one of the most prolific zombie writers out there, with nine books in this series plus spinoffs including a series of werewolf stories that take place many years after the zompoc.  Naturally, I’ve heard of Tufo for years.  This particular novel has nearly 1800 reviews on Amazon, which is a staggering number considering it was self-published.

This book has some similar characteristics to other notable books in this genre.  It is in a journal format, though the author strays from sticking with the main character’s perspective for certain portions of the book.  While this isn’t a major issue, it does point out the flaw in this type of storytelling-things the main character doesn’t know must be shared by other characters or in third person and it feels like a bit of a disruption when another voice jumps into for a chapter or two.

The prologue makes it clear the zombie apocalypse is about to get into full swing when a vaccination for a new strain of flu ends up bringing the dead back to life.  From there we switch over to narrator Mike Talbot, ex-Marine and family man, while he is getting ready to take a shower in his house.  This is interrupted when zombies show up on his front lawn and his family starts to freak out.  Mike is sort of a prepper/gun nut who has been fascinated by the idea of zombies for a long time, but it’s clear he isn’t prepared for the sudden all-out assault taking place on his neighborhood and threatening his family’s existence.

Things move pretty fast from the get go, with rescue trips to save family members and friends while Mike and his neighbors work to barricade the walled-in neighborhood from impending doom.  The story is, in many ways, pretty routine zompoc stuff, though the author throws a few curve balls into the mix.  This includes the idea that these zombies perhaps aren’t undead, but infected and still with a spark of life, and more importantly, perhaps a spark of intelligence.  There is also a hint of the supernatural, including a bit of prognostication and mental telepathy thrown in to give things a bit of mystery.

Overall, I can see why this series has been so popular.  Tufo uses snarky humor and heavily descriptive verse to describe the gore, the smells, and the overall madness engulfing his character’s life.  Despite some of the more odd things about Mike, he is, for the most part, just a family man trying his best to protect his loved ones in a time of ultimate danger-something very relatable.

That isn’t to say that I didn’t have some issues with the story or how it’s told.  Many of my complaints have been pointed in other reviews.  Though the story is fun and I’m intrigued as to how some of the more unique elements the author introduced here will be expanded upon in future volumes, I felt that many characters outside of Mike are somewhat one-dimensional.  This is in part due to the fact that a diary format is somewhat limited in stepping away from the single perspective it showcases.

Women in particular are given short shrift in this book.  Mike’s wife is somewhat of a stereotypical shrew who naturally is the only person on the planet he is afraid of, yet at the same time she appears to be helpless and lacking in common sense.  Despite having lived with a prepper for many years, she has no idea how to even load a weapon.  Neither does Mike’s daughter, for that matter, who, like her mama, has a mean temper and a stubborn streak a mile long.  Another woman who agrees to go a supply run outside the safety of the walls of Mike’s neighborhood does nothing more than cower in the truck while everyone else takes care of business.  All I could remember about the wife of Mike’s best friend was that she was a lousy shot-there is little else shared about her.

Mike is a funny character and his internal monologues and flashbacks are sometimes very amusing as he tries to make light of a desperate situation.  At other times his perspective is best described as a bit…off.  Comparing the horror of possibly being forced to shoot a loved one who has been attacked by a zombie to the more meager fear of speaking in public for the first seemed somewhat dismissive.  The obsession Mike has with his Jeep Wrangler and not using this durable off-road vehicle during the zombie apocalypse because it might get scratched plus having his family be fearful of his wrath if they use it even under desperate circumstances seemed a bit lacking in focus.  Mike would do anything for his family, and that comes across on almost every page, but there are occasional lapses in perspective like those above that seem a bit disjointed given the situation.

Despite the criticism I have, the book is fun and certainly does a good job of paving the way for future installments.  Without leaving things on a cliffhanger note, there is enough mystery hinted at to keep a reader guessing and wanting to know what is next-in particular related to the supernatural elements of this tale.

Zombie Fallout can be found here:      https://www.amazon.com/Zombie-Fallout-Mark-Tufo-ebook/dp/B003A022YO/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1473094523&sr=8-1


Donations for the horror film “Scythe” end tomorrow morning!

Nearly a month ago, I posted the information below.  While some of the details (like the promotional incentives that were running at that time) are not the same, the fact that Jim and his team are looking for a last minute run to give them a chance to make their horror film remains the same.  So check out the 15 minute teaser movie he made and give a few bucks if you can.  If it doesn’t hit the goal, you are out nothing, but if it does, you get to say you played a small part in helping a movie maker’s dream come true!

Every once in a while I like to break out of my normal routine and do something a bit different.  I watch horror films-quite a few, in fact, but I have only posted a review of a couple of them on my blog.  I stick to reviewing horror novels, and primarily independent stuff from independent authors and smaller presses.  After all, the “big” stuff gets along just fine whether I review it or not, while the smaller, lesser known works get a boost from every review they receive-good, bad, or indifferent.  Recognition and awareness is key to gaining a wider audience.  Especially if you are trying to turn your ‘little’ project into something bigger.  So I thought I would do my part and check out a short film by a guy named Jim Rothman (twitter handle: @ScytheJim), who is working hard on getting the crowdfunding to turn a fifteen minute short into a full length horror feature.  Jim shared his film with me for the promise of a fair and honest review.  And unlike so many other reviews I do, where I can only give you the link to go purchase your own copy, I am sharing the link so you can watch the film, in all its glory, for free, right now, without spending another dime!  Ain’t that somethin’?

Naturally, Jim is looking for donors to help fund this project, so while you don’t have to pay to watch the short, you might consider a contribution if you like what you see and would like to see more.  And Jim tossed in a bit of an extra for anyone who decides to donate $50 at supportscythe.com if they do so on Monday.  Whoever pledges $50 for the Baseball Cap and Blu-Ray package (again,ON Monday) will also get an autographed copy of the script.  Not too shabby a deal.   So, what’s all the hubbub about?  Well, you can watch the movie here: Scythe Short Film.

Okay, so we’ve gotten all the promotional stuff out of the way!  On to the review:

The setup with Scythe is fairly traditional slasher fare.  Two college aged girls are sitting in an apartment, one, Amy, lamenting what kind of impact she’ll manage to have on the world at large while she studies for exams.  She fears no one will remember her-that she will leave no impression on anyone else including future generations.  The other girl, offering up another hit off the joint they’ve been smoking, gives Amy a pep talk about how she will end up doing great things, just before our main character decides it’s time to walk home.  Next, we see the second girl turn on the television to watch a news report that a imprisoned killer has escaped and is on the loose in the local area.

Pretty routine set up, and in some ways, what follows is also pretty routine.  Where this film ended up resonating for me, in its brief time on my computer screen, was in the build up of tension that takes place after Amy begins her walk home and is warned, via cellphone by her friend, of the escaped maniac on the loose.  The filmmakers allow the energy to build, through the music, the surrounding environment, and through the main character’s expressions and body language.   Amy’s fear ebbs and flows based on what is going on around her, and that was what yanked me along with her through her harrowing journey.

In a film like this, even in short form, its as much what you know as you don’t know, and playing the guessing game about what will happen next.  We all do it-when will the slasher appear, and when will they administer the coup de grace?  If it’s predictable, it’s usually forgettable.  But when you guess wrong and you get that adrenaline rush because you’re startled, taken off guard, or even pee yourself a bit…that’s the payoff.  And for a short film that was produced in an effort to show the capabilities of these filmmakers and the promise of something greater, the payoff was there for me.  Much of it was in the promise of something greater rather than just what happens on the screen.  In other words, I took the bait right off the hook (or off the Scythe, in this case, har har).

The production values (I have a friend who always looooved to use that term when describing a film-it made him feel all refined and movie savvy, I suppose) were solid.  The acting was decent and the music, as I already mentioned, blends well with what is happening on screen.  Whatever the budget they had to make this promotional piece, it didn’t feel cheap, shabby, or hastily constructed.

The bottom line for me is not that this little film was mind altering or in and of itself a great standalone film.  It’s fun and entertaining, certainly, but more importantly, serves its purpose.  That purpose is to draw you in enough to want to see what the creators could do with the budget necessary to make a full length version of Scythe.

But don’t take my word for it.  Check it out yourself.  If you like it, promote it.  If you really like it, consider tossing a few coppers in the direction of the filmmakers so you can see even more of Scythe.  And if you don’t like it…well, it was just 15 minutes out of your life, now wasn’t it?


Review of Tonia Brown’s “Badass Zombie Road Trip”

From the title of this book, Badass Zombie Road Trip, I had a vision of an apocalyptic ride across undead highways in a classic car (maybe a convertible Caddy or a hot rod like an old Road Runner).  Even the picture used on the cover reinforced that vision.  Alas, it was not meant to be.  What I got instead was a tale of Jonah and Dale, best buddies, on the run to chase down a lost soul before the devil does them in.  Not a bad trade off, especially when Candy, a beautiful hitchhiker, is added to the mix.  She adds a bit of spice to the testosterone mix, especially since Dale, the Lothario of the duo, has his sights set on her as his next conquest, while Jonah, the meek and mild member of the pair, is falling hard for her in his own modest way.

The threesome has to make it cross country after a poorly thought out (and devilishly influenced) detour into California, where Dale soul is taken from him by Lucifer himself, collecting on a debt incurred during his childhood.  To save his friend, Jonah ups the stakes and tosses his soul into the mix if Satan will give them a chance to reclaim Dale’s soul.  Unfortunately for both of them, the Devil doesn’t play fair, so Dale is not only soulless, he’s lifeless too-though he can move around and talk…and he’s hungry for a bit more than junk food.

Jonah and Dale’s relationship is an interesting dynamic.  Dale is overwhelming, loud, obnoxious, and a letch, while Jonah is quiet, intelligent, sincere, and innocent.  They seem to fit together well, though Dale’s bullying tended to rub me the wrong way and I wanted Jonah to stand up for himself a bit more.  And that is where Candy, the intriguing hitchhiker who gets the boys into even more trouble, comes in.  She is beautiful, somewhat mysterious, and triggers strong interest from both of them.  Plus, she adds her own brand of trouble to the story that keeps things hopping.

Overall, the journey is an entertaining one, though it grinds through a few scenes.  Dragging a zombie across country that needs to feed on something…substantial…every now and then is definitely a cause for concern and plenty of misfortune.  The Devil is cunning and likes to cause as much woe for our road warriors as possible, which keeps things popping.  The dark humor here works and so does the relationship between the three main characters, who seem to mesh well, even when they’re causing each other major grief.  This is a quick read, and a fun one.

Badass Zombie Road Trip can be found here: http://www.amazon.com/Badass-Zombie-Road-Tonia-Brown-ebook/dp/B006ZAJ4M4/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8


Review of David Dunwoody’s “The Three Egos”

The Three Egos starts out by introducing the reader to ‘Talent’, a man who has avoided his past entanglements with the Devil for centuries, but slips up at the wrong time and is thrust into hell to meet the Fallen Angel he made a deal with centuries earlier.  While he is punished and tortured beyond death many times on his way to meet God’s former favorite, nothing is permanent in hell and so Satan has a proposition for him.  If he and one of the other ‘Egos’, Chith, find the third Ego, the two of them can negotiate new deals with the Devil.

Dunwoody assembles a diverse cast of characters, including a werewolf named Lace, Sue, a woman who has been cursed to be the last of the Escariot family line (and the Devil’s unwanted amorous attention), an array of angels, both fallen and those still loyal to an absentee God, plus Hell’s Chief Inspector, Hallows, who gets to play chaperone to this mixed up band of anti-heroes in their journey to find Sephus, the third Ego.  It is a journey that will take them from hell to purgatory, to the outer reaches of creation, and on to heaven itself.

This story is packed with the surreal and fantastic, the strange and the compelling, with characters that range from purely evil to blessed, though it is hard to tell which is which at any given moment.  David Dunwoody has provided the reader something unexpected here, with a touch of the epic (flavorful hints of Dante’s Divine Comedy abound), though the characters are believable and approachable, with human frailties and foibles.  He’s rolling the dice that readers will make the leap of faith with him on a journey some will see as profane, especially with God being more or less AWOL as a Supreme Being that is perhaps not so supreme after all.  Despite this, or perhaps because of it, The Three Egos is a wild ride well worth taking.

For the most part, the pacing is fast-so fast that the reader may need to stop and re-read a few passages here and there to keep pace and not miss a key detail.  It does slow a bit more than I would have preferred during the second act but that only serves to be a respite before moving on to the tale’s shocking and somewhat abrupt conclusion.  My guess is your mileage may vary on how things wrap up with this saga, but that is perhaps another reason to appreciate what the author has attempted.  Some questions the story generates are answered, while others that encompass far greater matters remain to be pondered after the final words are read.

The Three Egos can be found here:  http://www.amazon.com/3-Egos-David-Dunwoody-ebook/dp/B010J0VSTW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1457301977&sr=8-1&keywords=the+three+egos


Review of Martin Berman-Gorvine’s “All Souls Day”

All Souls Day provides the reader with an alternate history: what if the Cuban Missile Crisis escalated into war?  What if the nuclear holocaust that followed laid waste to much of what we know, except for one small town in Pennsylvania that was protected by the power of the ancient demon, Moloch?  In exchange for its protection, which shelters the townspeople from the burnt and irradiated outside world, the demon demands a virgin sacrifice each year, on the anniversary of the war, November 2nd, which gives this book its title.

This set up paves our introduction to the two main characters. Suzie, who is a ‘nice girl’ and cheerleader at Chatham High, and Amos, a ‘nerd’ who secretly has fallen for Suzie.  This is their senior year, over twenty years since Moloch took over and the sacrifices began.  As a nice girl, Suzie has the chance to be chosen on the night of her Senior Prom as the next virgin Moloch takes, while all Amos wants to do is moon over a girl he can never have.  Despite their differences, the two make a connection and along with some of their friends and some other members of their community, will try and stop the cycle of sacrifice and demon worship that has cursed their suburban paradise for far too many years.

The story is certainly creative, with a town somewhat frozen in time.  It is the mid-eighties when it takes place, but without any technological advancements, the town is reliant on horse-drawn carriages, farming, and slave labor from outside the wall Moloch has put up.  Muties, or mutants, are brought in by the small army Chatham’s Forge has formed, when they go out into the wastelands.  The high school, and the town by extension, has crafted a caste system, where you are assigned a rank once you enter high school.  So ‘nice girls’ are allowed to date ‘jocks’ but never ‘nerds’.  There are also ‘jesters’, ‘punks’, and ‘sluts’.  And instead of a traditional bible-belting preacher spreading the word of God, everyone worships Moloch.  The demon protects the town through his human servant, Pastor Justin, who exacts punishment on the faithless and disloyal.  The parallels between religious zealots of our day, whose devotion to their god goes as far as to sacrifice and kill for that deity, and these Moloch worshipers, are pretty straight forward.

Told in first person, the story switches between Suzie and Amos through most of the story, with later additions coming from their friends and other townsfolk introduced throughout the book.  Some of the timelines are a bit out of whack, especially in the final pages of the tale, but they all come together in the end.  The story runs through Suzie and Amos’s senior year and the months that follow their prom up to All Soul’s Day in November.

The story was very creative and extremely fresh.  If I have to point out a gripe, it had to do with Amos’s character, who does gain a bit of redemption here and there for being picked on as a nerd, but struck me as an incessant whiner and despite some of his actions, a major wimp.  The caste system created by the community exaggerates the stereotypes most of us experience in high school.  So despite the fact that Amos doesn’t need glasses to see, he is required to wear prototypical nerd glasses and the predictable nerd attire.  The abuse heaped upon him is almost ritualistic and both his fellow students and teachers participate in the fun.  The author has done a great job of fleshing out the caste system and having virtually everyone who never experienced the world prior to the Nuclear War that started the reign of Moloch accept their caste almost without question.  Still, as much as I can appreciate Suzie’s determination to revolt both in mind and body against being a nice girl and the horrors that Chatham’s Forge has to offer, Amos perpetuates his stereotype and yet still stumbles into almost everything good that happens to him despite his cowardice and incompetence.  If they had an ‘emo’ caste, he would be its leader.  Still, you can’t help yourself in rooting for him, Suzie, and their friends whose desire is to either escape, or annihilate their little slice of hell on earth.

All Soul’s Day is the first book in The Days of Ascension series by the author, and while we aren’t quite left with a cliffhanger, it comes pretty close. The author has created an intriguing world and it should be interesting to see what is out beyond the borders of Chatham’s Forge.

All Soul’s Day can be found here: http://www.amazon.com/All-Souls-Days-Ascension-Book-ebook/dp/B018F3CGWS/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1451876254&sr=1-4&keywords=all+souls+day


Review of Brian Moreland’s “Darkness Rising”

Darkness Rising is the latest novella from author Brian Moreland, who has written a diverse slate of supernatural horror stories over the course of the past few years.  I believe I have read most of his works and my reason for coming back is because his tales are vivid with a healthy dose of gore and grimness that splash across the pages in bright, primary colors.

Darkness Rising starts out as a somewhat traditional revenge tale, or so it seems to lead in that direction initially.  Naturally, it takes its fair share of dark turns that lead the reader far astray from its original intent.  It is clear that our main character, Marty Weaver, who is a janitor at a local college, is a sensitive soul who has been trodden upon one too many times and is ready to take out his anger on three sadists who catch him reading poetry next to a lonely, quiet part of a local lake while he pines for the woman he loves.

Of course, the author has something else up his sleeve and the story takes several wicked twists and turns.  The sadists in the story are real pieces of work, reminding me briefly of the villains in the movie “You’re Next” thanks to their use of animal masks and their lust for pain and anguish that they heap on their victims.

Marty is a likeable character, someone who is easy to root for.  While the author pulls no punches when it comes to what he must face (as well as memories of a tragic past that won’t let go), he is provided with the opportunity to release the darkness that resides inside him, as the description of this story alludes to.  This leads us to an even darker tale, one where revenge is still wafting through the air, but in ways that even Marty cannot fathom.

All in all, this is an entertaining, quick read, though I had a desire to see certain elements expanded upon-including the ‘dark artist’ aspect of the horror that is revealed to Marty.  His backstory is an interesting one, and Moreland has a deft touch when it comes to crafting creatures built out of nightmares.  The love story aspect of the tale is perhaps a bit fluffy, for lack of a better term, though not too cloying or maudlin given what horrors the reader and Marty have to come to grips with throughout the rest of this tale.  This is a fun, horrific story of revenge and regret by an up and coming author.

Darkness Rising can be found here:  http://www.amazon.com/Darkness-Rising-Brian-Moreland-ebook/dp/B00Y05TVUG/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8


Review of Vincenzo Bilof’s “Saint Pain”

Saint Pain wraps up the Zombie Ascension trilogy by Vincenzo Bilof.  The saga is complete, though some of the story threads remain loose, or a bit frayed, by the end of the tale.  Digesting it still, I’m not sure if that left me frustrated or content with how the author chose to close things out.  Doors are potentially left open for more, though whether they should be shut for good or not is debatable.

The book starts a full year past where Queen of The Dead left off.  Vega and Vincent are set up in a neighborhood with an old cop who doesn’t trust the ex-drug dealer.  There are quite a few people with them, including Father Joe and an ex-pro football player named Bill.  There are rumors of Vincent’s guns still hidden somewhere in the city (though he is not sharing any info) and stories of others in Detroit trading women and children for food and other supplies.  While the living have been active, the undead seem to have become lethargic.  Still, the harsh existence everyone faces has them questioning whether or not it is worth continuing to fight to survive.  In the meantime, Jim Traverse has returned to Detroit, apparently to finish the annihilation of the human race that he started a year before.

When the undead rise back up due to some sort of unknown force driving them to kill once again, everything is stirred up and those that are alive are forced to choose whether to fight or give up.  Vega wants another shot at Traverse while Vincent seems to be unsure of whether or not he wants to let go or to continue battling with Vega at his side.  Only Bill, the football player, seems willing to fight to the bitter end and save whoever he can, regardless of the consequences.  The reason why he is compelled to do so was one of the more poignant elements of this book, once revealed.

With all its supernatural elements and almost surreal quality to this story, where the author brings things home is when the humanity of his characters is revealed and/or demolished.  The madness of some, the despair of others, and the resignation of those who know they are about to die but are still willing to fight…plus those who have already died and yet still fight on for some sort of redemption.  These components to the story drew me in and kept me intrigued.  The supernatural components of this story gives it a unique kink that will entertain those who crave something beyond the traditional zombie tale.  There are layers of manipulation and control…by both the living and the dead…over the undead and those who have power over them.  It is a twisty pretzel the author has created here and I am not ashamed to admit I was a bit confused in a few spots as to who was manipulating who.

With its heavy dose of introspection, this book did have a few parts that dragged a bit.  Vega and Jim Traverse have always been interesting characters to me, with Vincent less so.  His melancholia didn’t keep me intrigued every step of the way.  I did enjoy the introduction of Bill, who seems like a character who you could root for despite his flaws.  He seems the only person capable of holding on to some semblance of hope even when that seems pointless.

Saint Pain is a fitting ending to Vincenzo Bilof’s unique zombie trilogy.  Though some of the characters are frustrating and despicable at turns, they were vividly drawn and draw you into their story, despite how dark, dank, and depressing it all becomes.

Saint Pain can be found here:   http://www.amazon.com/Saint-Pain-Zombie-Ascension-Book-ebook/dp/B00WS2LAFC/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=8-1&qid=1437239968