Writer of Horror Fiction

Review of Gerald Dean Rice’s “The 5000 Fingers of Bob”

The 5000 Fingers of Bob is a strange and creepy tale set in south during the Great Depression and tells the story of five men plotting the death of a local man they’ve dubbed Bob, even though they don’t know his real name.  They call him Bob because that’s what he calls everyone around town.  He is a man-child, a mentally handicapped man who is huge, eerie, but appears to be harmless on the surface.  But when one of the men finds him leaning over his daughter’s bed one night and throws Bob outside, only to find giant back inside, he suggests to his friends that they kill Bob, or do something else to (at the very least) dissuade him from doing any other disturbing things.  There are other rumors of Bob showing up in one place and then disappearing, and of things happening around him that are horrific, like the death of someone’s dog that is graphic and grotesque.

Things go wrong as the men continue to hatch their plot to put a stop to Bob and as they carry it out.  While the truth is somewhat muddled, it is clear that there is more to Bob than meets the eye.  This is a short story, and as such the author leaves out details that might reveal more about the nature of Bob and the supernatural shadowing effect that seems to surround him.  That serves the purpose of keeping things a mystery, even as more is revealed about the man who seems to be everywhere and nowhere at once.

A good, creative short story.  I do wish there were more details laid out there, but the author’s ability to set a scene and pull you into it as a reader gives this little tale a potent punch.

The 5000 Fingers of Bob can be found here: http://www.amazon.com/The-5000-Fingers-Bob-ebook/dp/B007FYBBQG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1340113984&sr=8-1&keywords=the+5000+fingers+of+bob

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